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How to Perform an Adhesive Strength T-Peel Test - ASTM D1876

  
  
  
  
  

Check out our latest page on ASTM D1876 here

There are many test methods used to determine the strength of an adhesive including peel, shear, cleavage, and tension tests.  Peel tests are common for tapes, labels, coatings, and other bonded materials.  There are three main types of peel tests including 90 degree peel test, 180 degree peel test, and a T-Peel test.  The Loop Tack test is similar in concept but is better classified as a tension test.

Why would you perform the T-Peel test instead of the 90 or 180 degree test?  Well, the 90 and 180 degree tests are commonly used where a flexible material with an adhesive or other bonding method is adhered to a more rigid substrate.  You would use the 90 over the 180 degree peel test if your flexible substrate can't be bent cleanly back to 180 degrees.  The T-Peel is used when both materials are either similar or both flexible.

The T-peel test requires that both of the bonded substrates are flexible.  This means that they need to be able to be bent up to a 90 degree angle without breaking.  Both substrates do not need to be the same material.

Below is a video of the T-Peel test.  If you want to see videos of the other peel tests, use these links: 90 degree peel, 180 degree peel, Loop Tack, Package Peel Strength ASTM F88, T-Peel Tissue Adhesives ASTM F2256.

This is a quick summary of the ASTM D1876 specification to decide if this test is right for you, and to point out what equipment you need to perform the test.

Equipment Required:

  1. Universal Testing MachineASTM D1876 T-Peel Test Setup on a Universal Testing Machine
    1. 1 kN capacity single column UTM is usually enough for this test.
    2. Servo controlled to keep a constant rate of speed.
  2. Tensile Grips (2)
    1. Each peel substrate needs to be held securely
  3. Software to calculate peak load and average load between extension points

Test Procedure

  1. Load each end of the sample into opposing tensile grips
  2. Separate grips at a constant rate of speed (see spec) throughout the length of the specimen (about 9 inches)
  3. Report peak load and average load per unit width of bond

ASTM D1876 T Peel Test Report

For reference to ASTM F2256 blog post on T-Peel adhesive bond testing.

    All ADMET testing systems are fully customizable. If you have any questions regarding an application or system, please call 800-667-3220 or email info@admet.com.

    Comments

    I have a question that I really hope you can answer: If you take to 100% identical pieces of plywood (same size, glue etc.)and test them for glue strength - will the glue be stronger in a pull perpendicular to the surfaces of the plywood piece or parallel to the glue line? Thanks in advance Troels Schmidt.
    Posted @ Friday, September 21, 2012 8:19 AM by Troels Schmidt
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